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eng111

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/15

20th Outlines returned. Rough draft work. Rough Draft Due: Don’t need intro & conclusion. Have at least one citation.

22nd Workshop. Class will be open. No official Roll.

27th Papers due.

29th: Syntax Review
May 6 late day to turn in anything

eng111: Notes 2010 04 13 Outline

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/13

Outlines due Thursday.

When you’re outline, your organizing.

A formal outline always has a thesis on the top.

Outlining has letters and numbers in a hierarchal format.

You don’t have an A without a B.

You don’t have an intro and conclusion in a a formal outline.

The further you indent, the more specifig you are, but don’t overlap or repeat.

All subs are at the same general level of specifically.

There are sentence outlines and topic outlines. In a sentence outline, all items are sentences. In a topic outline, there are no sentences (except the thesis at the top.).

In a topic outline, All items have to be the same grammatical type and level of generality as their siblings.

eng111: Notes from Krey “State Vs Federal: The Nullification Movement”

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/13

Krey, Patrick. “STATE VS FEDERAL: The Nullification Movement. (Cover story).” New American (08856540) 26.5 (2010): 10-16. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 13 Apr. 2010.

eng111: Notes from Wilentz States of Anarchy

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/13

Wilentz, Sean. “States of Anarchy.” New Republic 241.6 (2010): 5-6. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 13 Apr. 2010

The idea that states have the right to disobey federal law was broached by pro-slavery segregationalists prior to the civil war.

The issue has been repeadely decided and brought up again, and is today being raised by those who don’t know their history or the law.

Even Adrew Jackson proclaimed that it was a “basic misunderstanding” that the United States is made up of soverign states who have the power to declare federal law null and void.

States Rights issues were used in an attempt to force seggregatin in schools.

eng111: Research Paper Outline

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/11

A strong federal government is in keeping with the beliefs of many of
our founding fathers, benefits American’s quality of life while making
our country stronger, and is even more important now than it was before
modern advances in communication, transportation, and weaponry.

I. The message which states that the founding fathers generally agreed to a minimalist federal government is a lie that has been spread by supporters of such a government.
A. Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson famously sparred on this issue.
B. Washington and Madison supported a strong central government

II. A weak central government causes a weak nation.
A. The South could not fight cohesively because their business model prevented it.
B. The great world powers; Egypt, Rome, Great Britain, the US, where/are not loosely formed confederations.

III. A strong central government – If it’s a true republic – better serves it’s people.

IV. The motivation behind State’s Rights is the circumvention of Civil Rights
A. Despite revisionist assertions, Slavery was one of the primary reasons Southern states seceded, and was intertwined with state sovereignty
B. States Rights advocates generally disagree with equal rights legislation supported by the American majority.

V. A strong central government is more important now than it ever was.
A. Governing a large geographic is no longer as problematic as it was.
1. Taxation W/O representation occurred because of logistics.
2. The Coast Guard used to be split into Atlantic and Pacific areas, but has reorganized to become more unified.
B. Advances in transportation make it more difficult than before to enforce contraband laws when neighboring states have incompatible definitions of contraband.
C. Differing regulations among states impede interstate commerce.

eng111: Schedule for April & May

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/10

1 H Argument continued
6 T Argument In Class

13 T Rough draft: Documenting
15 H Outline Due: Documenting

20 T Rough Draft Due
22 H Workshop

27 T Research Paper #6 Due = 20%
Writing Skills Review
29 H Writing Skills Review

May
6 H Syntax Test = 10%

eng111: Thesis Statement and Working Bibliograpy for the Research Paper

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/10

A strong federal government is in keeping with the beliefs of many of
our founding fathers, benefits American’s quality of life while making
our country stronger, and is even more important now than it was before
modern advances in communication, transportation, and weaponry.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“Political Views of the U.S. Founding Fathers.” History in Dispute, Vol. 12: The American Revolution, 1763-1789. Keith Krawczynksi, ed. St. James Press, 2003. Reproduced in History Resource Center. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale. http://galenet.galegroup.com.ezproxy.vccs.edu:2048/servlet/HistRC/

“Federalists and Antifederalists.” Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History. 3 vols. Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2001. Reproduced in History Resource Center. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale. http://galenet.galegroup.com.ezproxy.vccs.edu:2048/servlet/HistRC/

Casto, William R. “There Were Great Men Before Agamemnon.” Vanderbilt Law Review 62.2 (2009): 371-405. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 24 Mar. 2010

Clark, Bradford R. “Federal Lawmaking and the Role of Structure in Constitutional Interpretation.” California Law Review 96.3 (2008): 699-730. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 25 Mar. 2010.

“Marbury v. Madison.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition (2009): 1. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 25 Mar. 2010.

Corwin, Edward Samuel, John Marshall and the Constitution; a chronicle of the Supreme court, 2002-06-01, Reproduced in Project Gutenburg.

Dionne, E J Jr, “Health care and the New Nullifiers”, The Washington Post. March 2010. Web. March 25, 2010.

Goldstone, Lawrence, The Activist: John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and the Myth of Judicial Review, 2008 Walker & Co.,

Henretta, James A., David Brody, and Lynn Dumenil. America: A Concise History. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2002.

Krey, Patrick. “STATE VS FEDERAL: The Nullification Movement. (Cover story).” New American (08856540) 26.5 (2010): 10-16. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 25 Mar. 2010.

La Croix, Alison, “How the noisy debate over states’ rights distorts history and the intent of federalism”. The Washington Post. March 2010, Web 25 March 2010.

LIPTAK, ADAM. “Tea-ing Up the Constitution.” New York Times 14 Mar. 2010: 1. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 25 Mar. 2010.

Stangl, Vickie. “10th Amendment Does Not Trump the Supremacy Clause.” The Kansas City Free Press. Everyday Citizen Media, March 2010, Web. 24 March, 2010.

Thomas, Emory The Confederate Nation New York Harper and Row, 1979.

Scribner, Heather. “A Fundemental Misconception of Separation of Powers: Boumedian vs. Bush”

Sloan, Cliff, The great decision : Jefferson, Adams, Marshall, and the battle for the Supreme Court
New York : PublicAffairs, c2009

eng111

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 04/06

Method of debate.

1 Affirmative                     2 Negative
4 Presents Complaints         3 Questions Affirmative
5 Questions Negative           6 Presents Views
8 Presents Possible Solution  7 Questions
9 Final Presentation            10 Final Presentation

eng111: 2010 Mar 30: Arguments

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 03/30

Topic: Arguing.

Thinking Patterns include: Reporting; Inferring; Judging.

Reporting: Just getting the facts.
Inferring: Your interpretation and extention of the facts.
Judging: Your opinion of the facts

My bus was late today: Report
My bus will probably be late tomorrow: Inference
The bus system is unreliable: Judgement

Reporting: Describing the world in ways that can be verified through investigation

Inferring: Describing the world in ways that are based on factual information yet go beyond this information to make statements about what is not currently known

Judging: Describing the world in ways that express our evaluation based on certain criteria

In your papers, research to find the facts; infer your conclusions; than evaluate your conclusions based on the facts and inferences.

eng111

Posted in eng111 by bnmng on 2010 03/25

Tues: Working Thesis Due: Take a stab what what you’re going to try to say.

Book tells three ways to take notes.

Know what you got and where you got it down to the page.

Check the three ways the book suggests but do whatever works for you.

Outlines will be collected 15th April.

Aristotle Argument Style:
Present your thesis
Deal with the Opposition
(this lets the opposition know that you’re
honest and honorable).
Make concessions.
Present benefits of your view.

Our books have a different order.